dust rss sort by issue

Issue 04/2017

Mitigating the risks and impact of explosions

IEC Standards help reduce the number of casualties from accidental industrial explosions

Explosions in a wide range of industrial or other installations can be caused by the wrong or faulty equipment, and/or by poor operating procedures or mistakes. Risks can be significantly reduced if equipment and systems that meet IEC Standards developed by IEC Technical Committee (TC) 31: Equipment for explosive environments, are used. 

Issue 02/2017

Dusty business

IECEx-certified equipment key in mitigating explosion risks

Some industry sectors are automatically associated with explosive (Ex) atmospheres – oil and gas, petrochemical plants, mining and in particular coal mining. Many others won’t necessarily come to mind although the risk of fire and explosion exists and needs to be heeded. Food processing, sugar refineries, grain handling and storage, printing, paper and textile industries, sawmills, woodworking areas or waste treatment operations are all potential hazardous areas. Not to mention gas stations or aircraft refuelling and hangars.

2016
Issue 02/2016

Widespread risks

How best to ensure protection of industrial assets in hazardous areas

Contrary to preconceived ideas, hazardous areas are not the “privilege” of a few specific industry sectors. They can be found almost anywhere at any given time when certain conditions leading to the formation of an explosive atmosphere are met.

Issue 01/2016

Ex aspects of food safety

How to protect food processing from explosion risks

Do you realize that your local bakery may be a potentially hazardous location? In fact any area where flour, sugar, or any other type of powder is stored or processed is a potential risk area. Your kitchen as well, if you think of it, since you’re bound to regularly use a wide variety of ingredients in powder form.

2014
Issue 03/2014

Exploding silos

Staple support from IECEx

Wherever cereals are grown in large quantities it is common to see silos used to store grain. Not so common is the knowledge that in these silos, or with any of the food processing equipment likely to be found alongside them, the thin layer of dust resulting from the processing has the potential to make a farm go up in flames.